• Contents include:
    • A Souterrain in a Midden at Culleenamore
    • A Chair for Dubhaltach Mac Fhir Bhisigh
    • The ‘Poets Chairs’ at Skreen
    • Mac Fhirbhisigh Memorial: unveiling
    • Evidence for Surnames in Sligo Placenames
    • Jones Family, Benada Abbey, Co. Sligo
    • German Perceptions of Sligo: 1850s, Col. W.G. Wood-Martin, 1847 - 1917
    • Marine Debris Along the Sligo Coast
    • Death’s-head Hawk-moth in Co. Sligo
    • An Interview with Jack Flynn.
  • The fourth instalment of the Sligo Field Club Journal edited by Martin A. Timoney and Jim Foran.  
  • Contents Waddell, John: Equine cults and Celtic goddesses, 5-18. Hicks, Ronald: The rout of Ailill and Medbh: myth on the landscape, 19-34. Fenwick, Joe: The late prehistoric ‘Royal Site’ of Rathcroghan, Co. Roscommon: an enduring paradigm of enclosed sacred space, 35-51. McCarthy, Mike & Curley, Daniel: Exploring the nature of the Fráoch Saga – An examination of associations with the legendary warrior on Mag nAí, 53-62. Warner, R.B.: Ptolemy’s River Winderis: a corrected identification, a sea-monster and Roman material from the adjacent sandhills, 63-67 Ó Drisceoil, Cóilín & Walsh, Aidan: New radiocarbon dates for the Black Pig’s Dyke at Aghareagh West and Aghnaskew, County Monaghan, 69-79. Brandherm, Dirk; McSparron, Cormac; Kahlert, Thorsten & Bonsall, James: Topographical and geophysical survey at Knocknashee, Co. Sligo – Results from the 2016 campaign, 81-96. Wilkinson, Anthony: Knocknashee – Local perceptions, 97-98. McCafferty, Patrick: The fear of fairy forts: archaeological preservation by plague and superstition, 99-106.
  • This 2nd edition of the book explores the history and times past of the parish of Taughmaconnell in South Roscommon and comes eighteen years on from the first iteration. The aim of the book is to provide a window into a way of life, much of which is no longer to be seen. It is the story of struggle, comradeship and an appreciation of community.
  • Richly illustrated, this book is a valuable resource not just for the people of Roscommon, but a template for memorial studies in other counties. This research began in 2012 with the study of the grave memorials of the late 17th century to the 1860's in Ballintober Old, Co. Roscommon. The richness of memorial work here is indication of the importance of Ballintober and the O'Conor family. A catalogue of these memorials, including the full inscription, photo and references is given. Details: 528 A4 pages, 1,331 colour images, hardback only. Mary B. Timoney, originally from Waterford and living in south Sligo, has been researching graveyard memorials since 1984. She received an M. A. from UCC in 2001 for her study of 'The Decorated Box Tombs of the Skreen School, Co. Sligo, c. 1780 - 1850'. In 2005 she published 'Had Me Made, A Study of the Grave Memorials of Co. Sligo fro c. 1650 to the Present'. She has lectured and published on grave memorials in Co.s Cavan, Monaghan, Roscommon and Sligo as well as on the Association for the Preservation of the Memorials of the Dead, Ireland, and on the care of graveyards.
  • Examines one of the most important frontier regions of Europe in the thirteenth century by defining the relationship between Gaelic lords, Anglo-Norman lords, and the medieval environmental landscape of the King’s Cantreds, a space that was both the homeland of O’Conor royal authority from the eighth century and a defined holding of the English kings in the early thirteenth century. This work offers a new and innovative insight into the history of thirteenth-century Ireland by exploring the interplay between Gaelic lords, Anglo-Norman lords, and the medieval environmental landscape that connected them. Focusing on the king’s cantreds of Roscommon, a space that was both the homeland of the O’Conor royal authority from the eighth century and a defined holding of the English kings from the early thirteenth century. The book explores the frontier landscape as an active player in its own right within Irish history and discusses the way that both Gaels and Anglo-Normans interacted with, and were in turn influenced by, this environment. This unique approach to Irish history enables the author to step away from the traditional view of a dyadic relationship between Gaelic and Anglo-Norman lords and instead demonstrate that not only did both sides alter and change the environment around them according to their perceptions of their enemies and the threat posed by the land, but that the landscape itself was to play a significant role in shaping and influencing the identities and destiny of its inhabitants.
  • The town and castle of Rindoon were founded in 1227 as a royal Anglo-Norman borough and fortress on the sometimes turbulent frontier between the Anglo- Norman colony in Ireland and a region controlled by the Irish O'Conor kings of Connacht. The well preserved remains at Rindoon are regarded as being one of the most important medieval complexes still standing in Britain and Ireland. It is, also, without doubt one of the finest examples in Europe of a deserted medieval town. The deserted town and castle of Rindoon are situated on the peninsula of St. John's Point, which runs out south eastwards from the western, Connacht shore of Lough Ree. It is hoped that this guidebook will provide not only information, but enjoyment for those who visit Rindoon and St. John's Point. Its detailed nature will hopefully also make it a contribution to the ongoing academic research currently being carried out on Ireland's medieval towns, castles, abbeys and priories.
  • Emania is the premier interdisciplinary journal publishing original research on Ireland's Celtic past. The main focus of the journal is on the Ulster Cycle of tales, the ancient 'Royal Sites' of Ireland and the archaeology and environment of Ireland in the period from the Late Bronze Age until the Early Medieval period. The contents of issue 22 is as follows:
    • Editorial
    • Ranke de Vries: The Ulster Cycle in the Netherlands
    • J.P. Mallory and Gina Baban:  Excavations in Haughey’s Fort East
    • Meriel McClatchie: Food Production in the Bronze Age: Analysis of Plant Macro-remains from Haughey’s Fort, Co. Armagh
    • Gina Baban: Late Bronze Age Pottery from the Excavations at Haughey’s Fort East
    • Dirk Brandherm: Late Bronze Age casting debris and other base metal finds from Haughey’s Fort
    • R.B. Warner: The Gold Fragments from Haughey’s Fort, Co. Armagh: Description and XRF Analysis
    • Rena Maguire: The Y-piece: Function, Production, Typology and Possible Origins
    • Billy Ó Foghlú: Irish Iron Age Horns, and the Conical Spearbutt of Navan: A Mouthpiece Investigation
    • Chris Lynn: Some Pictish Symbols: Leatherworking Diagrams and Razor Holders?
    • Grigory Bondarenko: A ‘Kshatriya Revolution’ in the Ulster Cycle?
    • Paul Gosling: The Route of Táin Bó Cúailnge Revisited
  • Remembering St. Comán - Patron Saint of Ros Comáin by Noel Hoare. This book traces the legacy of St. Comán across the centuries, and in so doing sheds light on generations of Roscommon people. This is a comprehensive historical, archaeological and folklore-based study carried out by amateur historian Noel Hoare, where no stone was left unturned as he sought to bring the story of St. Comán and his importance in Co. Roscommon to light. A must have for anyone interested in Roscommon and it's origins.
  • Covering a large swathe of the eastern part of the county, 'Sliabh Bán, A Historical Journey', is a 470-page volume which chronicles the lives and times of generations past who lived on and around the rugged mountain. This publication is the culmination of twenty years of research and writing by Henry Owens of Lismehy. He has been assisted in recent years by Mike Lennon, now Dublin-based, but who grew up in Corbohill.  
  • For the nostalgic among you, this classic album by Horslips is a must for any music collection. Still great after all these years. Track List - Setanta, Maeves Court, Charolais,The March, You Can't Fool The Beast, Dearg Doom, Ferdia's Song, Gae Bolga, Cu Chulainn's Lament, Faster Than The Hound, The Silver Spear, More Than You Can Chew, The Morrigan's Dream, Time To Kill. Jim Lockhart keyboards, flute, whistles, uilleann pipes, vocals. Eamon Carr drums, bodhran, percussion. Barry Devlin bass, vocals. Charles O’Connor fiddle, mandolin, concertina, vocals. Johhny Fean guitar, banjo, vocals.
  • Pack of Six Celtic Mythology Greeting Cards depicting Tír na nÓg, The Children of Lir, Queen Medb, Étaín and Midir, Deirdre of the Sorrows and Cúchulainn. An ideal gift for mythology enthusiasts. Image on the front, text on the back, blank on the inside for your message. Format 5x7. Individually sealed with envelopes.
  • This driving tour has been designed for the visitor to Rathcroghan to be able to experience a selection of the great number of monuments on the landscape here in your own time and at your own pace. This unique environment has been interacted with for over 6,000 years, beginning in the Neolithic, and continuing to be used in different forms up until the late medieval period at least. The monuments here fall into a range of categories, from burial and funerary monuments, to settlement sites and field boundaries. Aside from these, monuments such as Rathcroghan Mound and the cave of Oweynagat give us an insight into the minds of the people who constructed and used these monuments. Viewing this archaeological landscape in association with the huge corpus of medieval Irish literature that refers to Cruachan Aí and, in particular, the cast of characters that we encounter in the epic Táin Bó Cúailnge (Cattle Raid of Cooley) allows us to gain an understanding of the lives and beliefs of the Iron Age and early historic Irish.
  • It would be impossible to discuss Irish history or mythology without considering its most vivid female character, the Iron Age Warrior Queen Medb (Maeve). Although once generally regarded as an historical character, modern scholars see her in a somewhat different light, in the guise of a divine goddess like figure. Whichever way you consider her there is no doubt that she captures the imagination of generations. Perhaps this is due to the fact that Medb seems to embody all aspects, from the royal and sacred, to the mythological and divine. This enigmatic queen crosses all borders with her universal appeal, and it is certainly no exaggeration for us to regard her as a national emblem. This beautiful bespoke fold out Family Tree Wallchart display, gives details of Queen Medb's life, character, numerous marriages and offspring, death and burial. Size - A2, full colour, 200gsm gloss.
  • One of three limited bespoke ogham plaques exclusively produced for Rathcroghan Visitor Centre. Featuring a representation of the Mórrígan – Mór Ríoghain (Great Queen) the Battle Goddess of Ireland whose ‘fit abode’ is the Cave of Oweynagat, Rathcroghan, Co. Roscommon.
  • One of three limited, bespoke ogham plaques exclusively produced for Rathcroghan Visitor Centre, featuring a representation of Fráoch, the legendary warrior of Connacht, whose heroic deeds are immortalised on the Rathcroghan landscape. This reference is based on the Ogham inscription at Oweynagat, Rathcroghan, Co. Roscommon.  
  • One of three limited, bespoke Ogham plaques exclusively produced for Rathcroghan Visitor Centre, featuring a representation of Medb (Maeve), the warrior queen who ruled Connacht from her seat in Rathcroghan. A central figure in Ireland’s epic past and instigator of the great Táin Bó Cuailnge (Cattle Raid of Cooley). This is our earliest reference to Medb, based on the Ogham inscription at Oweynagat, Rathcroghan, Co. Roscommon.
  • 'The Morrigan at the Cave of Oweynagat', t-shirt. A unique, high quality ADULT t-shirt, exclusively produced for Rathcroghan Visitor Centre. (Image by Charlotte Krause)
  • This guidebook contains entries on every aspect of Rathcroghan, from its archaeological and historical landscapes, through to its literary and mythological associations. This publication is the quintessential user’s guide to this fascinating archaeological landscape. Drawing upon historical, literary and cutting-edge archaeological research, Rathcroghan: The Guidebook is designed to bring the reader on a journey through time at Rathcroghan, from the first settlers to this broad limestone plain in the Neolithic period, through to the political mechanics of late medieval Machaire Connacht. Thereafter, you will be taken on a journey of a different kind. You will see how our ancestors wove a tapestry of literature on top of this canvas of Rathcroghan, connecting physical landmarks and ancestor burials with the intoxicating narrative of Queen Medb of Connacht and the Ulster Cycle of Tales, filled with war and strife, jealousy and intrigue, gods and mere mortals.