• The fourth instalment of the Sligo Field Club Journal edited by Martin A. Timoney and Jim Foran.  
  • Contents include:
    • Bunduff Four-poster
    • A Sand Dune or Mound
    • Moytara Stone Axheads
    • A Priest, A Cairn and a Bead
    • A Violent Death in Medieval Sligo
    • The Place Name Bradullen
    • Sligo Salt Industry : 1700-1850
    • Map of Sligo Gas Network in 1861
    • Gulls of Sligo Town
    • Dragonflies and Damselflies of Sligo
    • Yeats International Summer School.
  • Sligo Field Club was 70 years old in 2015 and to celebrate the occasion it has published the first volume of what it hopes will be an annual journal. There are 15 articles covering a period of 5,000 years. Topics included:
    • Megalithic tombs of Sligo
    • Early Christian sites and early roads
    • The symbolism of Griffins
    • Folklore on the source of the Moy
    • The Spanish Armada and Sligo business history
    • The Jalandhar Mutiny
    • Barytes mining and aspects of the natural world such as ornithology, butterflies and moths.
  • Full Descriptions of Eighty Memorials from all over Co. Sligo with comparative entries for over 500 memorials which commemorate past loved ones, some, the short and only annals of many a departed soul, others monuments of national importance, together with notices, details and location of the graveyards. The styles of artwork, the first written description of the Masons of Sligo, who so lovingly carved these monuments, notices of the families commemorated, their lives and properties illustrated by 230 photographs, selected from an archive of 7,000 photographs, rubbings, drawings and a map. Provided to assist the reader in appreciating those memorials and the many other memorials to the dead of Co. Sligo of the last 4 centuries.
  • Emania is the premier interdisciplinary journal publishing original research on Ireland's Celtic past. The main focus of the journal is on the Ulster Cycle of tales, the ancient 'Royal Sites' of Ireland and the archaeology and environment of Ireland in the period from the Late Bronze Age until the Early ​ The contents of issue 21 are as follows:
    • Editorial
    • Maria Tsvetoukhina, Tatyana Mikhailova, Grigory Bondarenko:
    • The Ulster Cycle in Russia
    • Mary Leenane:
    • Cú Chulainn’s ríastrad and Related Contortions
    • R.B. Warner:
    • Ptolemy’s Isamnion Promontory: Rehabilitation and Identification
    • John Ó Neill:
    • Lieutenant-General Alexander Campbell’s Loughnashade Horn
    • R.B. Warner:
    • A Lost, Iberian-style, Bronze Age Gold Neck-ring from near Navan, Co. Armagh
    • C. O. Hunt:
    • Fire, Rush Lights and Pine at Navan?
    • Victoria Ginn:
    • Power to the People: Reinterpreting Bronze Age Society
    • M. Baillie and D. Brown:
    • A Chronological Framework for the Period from 208 BC to AD 600
    • Lisa Coyle McClung:
    • The Late Iron Age Lull – not so Late Iron Age after all!
  • Roscommon map history, dozens of detailed maps. An exciting pictorial journey through maps of Roscommon from the 1500's to the present. Below is a collection of maps included in the dvd. ​- Mercator 1592 - Ortelius 1598 - Boazio 1606 - Visscher 1689 - 1700 Thompson Family Names - Roscommon County Map 1776 - 1817 Edgeworth -7 Griffin - 1837 Samuel Lewis - L. J. Richards Memorial Atlas 1901 - Roscommon Irish Place names - Irish Maps from 1898 - Eire 2016 Map proposal
  • This collection of 34 essays celebrates fifty years of the Sligo Field Club and reflect the interests of its members in the archaeology and environment of County Sligo, Ireland. A wide variety of subjects are included supported by photographs, illustrations and maps. With contributions from the likes of Stefan Bergh, Mary B. Timoney, Peter Harbison, Catherine Swift, Nollaig Ó Muraíle, Kieran O'Conor, Etienne Rynne and many more, it provides a fascinating insight into Co. Sligo's past and heritage.
  • A wide range of authors describe, analyse, interpret and re-interpret parts of the complex understudied, and at times misunderstood, archive of eight thousand years of Co. Sligo’s past. Drawing on new and exciting knowledge about what Sligo looked like at times in the remote past, the events which changed lifestyles and the products of humble and status craftsmen the authors give us a greater understanding of our county and its place in Ireland’s past and present and they inform us of some inspired intellectual and artistic giants of more recent centuries. The illustrations draw us out into the Sligo landscape, so richly endowed with the natural beauty, archaeology and history that surrounds us all the days of our lives.
  • One of three limited, bespoke Ogham plaques exclusively produced for Rathcroghan Visitor Centre, featuring a representation of Medb (Maeve), the warrior queen who ruled Connacht from her seat in Rathcroghan. A central figure in Ireland’s epic past and instigator of the great Táin Bó Cuailnge (Cattle Raid of Cooley). This is our earliest reference to Medb, based on the Ogham inscription at Oweynagat, Rathcroghan, Co. Roscommon.
  • One of three limited, bespoke ogham plaques exclusively produced for Rathcroghan Visitor Centre, featuring a representation of Fráoch, the legendary warrior of Connacht, whose heroic deeds are immortalised on the Rathcroghan landscape. This reference is based on the Ogham inscription at Oweynagat, Rathcroghan, Co. Roscommon.  
  • One of three limited bespoke ogham plaques exclusively produced for Rathcroghan Visitor Centre. Featuring a representation of the Mórrígan – Mór Ríoghain (Great Queen) the Battle Goddess of Ireland whose ‘fit abode’ is the Cave of Oweynagat, Rathcroghan, Co. Roscommon.
  • Paul Connolly, originally from Mount Talbot, County Roscommon, has a keen interest in history, particularly in the history of his local area and county. Paul is the administrator for the very popular Facebook page that shares its name with this publication. This beautiful bespoke book is a paperback and the width of the spine gives an indication of the thickness of the book, 273 pages jam packed full of photographs and information.
  • Richly illustrated, this book is a valuable resource not just for the people of Roscommon, but a template for memorial studies in other counties. This research began in 2012 with the study of the grave memorials of the late 17th century to the 1860's in Ballintober Old, Co. Roscommon. The richness of memorial work here is indication of the importance of Ballintober and the O'Conor family. A catalogue of these memorials, including the full inscription, photo and references is given. Details: 528 A4 pages, 1,331 colour images, hardback only. Mary B. Timoney, originally from Waterford and living in south Sligo, has been researching graveyard memorials since 1984. She received an M. A. from UCC in 2001 for her study of 'The Decorated Box Tombs of the Skreen School, Co. Sligo, c. 1780 - 1850'. In 2005 she published 'Had Me Made, A Study of the Grave Memorials of Co. Sligo fro c. 1650 to the Present'. She has lectured and published on grave memorials in Co.s Cavan, Monaghan, Roscommon and Sligo as well as on the Association for the Preservation of the Memorials of the Dead, Ireland, and on the care of graveyards.
  • Rathcroghan (Crúachain) is often referred to as both a 'Celtic' Royal Settlement and a sacred burial place; it is one of several major royal sites in ancient Ireland, such as Tara, Co. Meath, Knockaulin, Co. Kildare, and Navan Fort near Armagh, that are frequently mentioned in early literature. While these sites had special importance in early historic times, and in some cases bore and extraordinary weight of myth and legend, we now know that they are older archaeological assemblages of impressive complexity and size. This book is the result of a major programme of archaeological field research at Rathcroghan in County Roscommon in the West of Ireland. The project involved the use of a range of geophysical techniques to explore a number of extraordinary monuments in the Royal Site.
  • Examines one of the most important frontier regions of Europe in the thirteenth century by defining the relationship between Gaelic lords, Anglo-Norman lords, and the medieval environmental landscape of the King’s Cantreds, a space that was both the homeland of O’Conor royal authority from the eighth century and a defined holding of the English kings in the early thirteenth century. This work offers a new and innovative insight into the history of thirteenth-century Ireland by exploring the interplay between Gaelic lords, Anglo-Norman lords, and the medieval environmental landscape that connected them. Focusing on the king’s cantreds of Roscommon, a space that was both the homeland of the O’Conor royal authority from the eighth century and a defined holding of the English kings from the early thirteenth century. The book explores the frontier landscape as an active player in its own right within Irish history and discusses the way that both Gaels and Anglo-Normans interacted with, and were in turn influenced by, this environment. This unique approach to Irish history enables the author to step away from the traditional view of a dyadic relationship between Gaelic and Anglo-Norman lords and instead demonstrate that not only did both sides alter and change the environment around them according to their perceptions of their enemies and the threat posed by the land, but that the landscape itself was to play a significant role in shaping and influencing the identities and destiny of its inhabitants.
  • The Galway Archaeological and Historical Society was founded in 1900 to promote the study of the archaeology and history of the west of Ireland. Since 1900 the society has published forty-five Volumes of its journal of the Galway Archaeological and Historical Society, a publication which is an essential work of reference for anyone working in the area of Irish History and archaeology. With this support of the Heritage Council, the full text of these forty-five Volumes is now available on compact disk.
  • This investigation considers the places on the Irish landscape where open-air Gaelic royal inauguration assemblies were held in the period c. 1100-1600. Specially designated inauguration sites played an important role in the political life of Gaelic lordships in later medieval Ireland. Gaelic ruling families often appropriated prehistoric ritual landscapes for their royal assemblies in order to attach the pedigree of a royal candidate to an illustrious past; such sites might be an alleged burial place of an eponymous ancestor or a legendary heroic figure, or an ancient landscape associated with renowned events. This study of their physical appearance, place-names, and geographical and historical contexts ranges over all the archaeological sites identified as inauguration places - enclosures, sepulchral mounds, natural places, ringforts and churches, and associated inauguration furniture in the form of leaca and stone thrones, basin stones and sacred trees. Irish royal assembly places and practices are viewed in relation to sites elsewhere in Britain and greater Europe, and the circumstances that brought about the ending of the Gaelic practice of inauguration are also considered. Author - Elizabeth Fitzpatrick
  • Cattle have been the mainstay of Irish farming since the Neolithic began in Ireland almost 6000 years ago. Cattle, and especially cows, have been important in the life experiences of most Irish people, directly and/or through legends such as the Táin Bó Cuailnge (The Cattle- raid of Cooley). In this book, diverse aspects of cattle in Ireland, from the circumstances of their first introduction to recent and ongoing developments in the management of grasslands - still the main food-source for cattle in Ireland - are explored in thirteen essays written by experts. New information is presented, and several aspects relating to cattle husbandry and the interactions of cattle and people that have hitherto received little or no attention are discussed. Michael O'Connell is Professor emeritus at the National University of Ireland, Galway (NUIG) where he has been involved in research, teaching and administration for over four decades. Fergus Kelly is a Senior Professor emeritus in the School of Celtic Studies, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies. His main academic interests are in early Irish legal and social history. ​James H. McAdam is an Honorary Professor in the School of Biological Sciences, Queen's University Belfast and head of the Crops, Grassland and Ecology branch in the Agri-Food and Biosciences Institute (AFBI), Northern Ireland.