• Centenary in Reflection 2016 Anthology is a momentous is snapshot of global and local history and culture; a space created to review times past, voiced by writers and students locally and internationally. Provocative words on two world wars, emigration, and reminiscences about 'how we once lived' are contained within these pages. The story of how, as a nation re-birthed through the 1916 rebellion, it is that event and the fundamental truths proclaimed in the Proclamation of the Republic that haunts the psyche of our imagination, informing our views about the needs of the present as we rise to the challenges that lie ahead. 'The Irish Republic is entitled to and hereby claims the allegiance of the Irishman and Irishwoman. The Republic guarantees religious and civil liberty, equal rights and equal opportunities to all its citizens.' Let the story begin. ​SiarScéal is an annual festival that celebrates the history and culture of the Roscommon environs, through all art forms and media and with the participation of communities and schools. The Festival also hosts the international Hanna Greally Literary Awards.
  • Rathcroghan (Crúachain) is often referred to as both a 'Celtic' Royal Settlement and a sacred burial place; it is one of several major royal sites in ancient Ireland, such as Tara, Co. Meath, Knockaulin, Co. Kildare, and Navan Fort near Armagh, that are frequently mentioned in early literature. While these sites had special importance in early historic times, and in some cases bore and extraordinary weight of myth and legend, we now know that they are older archaeological assemblages of impressive complexity and size. This book is the result of a major programme of archaeological field research at Rathcroghan in County Roscommon in the West of Ireland. The project involved the use of a range of geophysical techniques to explore a number of extraordinary monuments in the Royal Site.
  • Emania is the premier interdisciplinary journal publishing original research on Ireland's Celtic past. The main focus of the journal is on the Ulster Cycle of tales, the ancient 'Royal Sites' of Ireland and the archaeology and environment of Ireland in the period from the Late Bronze Age until the Early ​ The contents of issue 21 are as follows:
    • Editorial
    • Maria Tsvetoukhina, Tatyana Mikhailova, Grigory Bondarenko:
    • The Ulster Cycle in Russia
    • Mary Leenane:
    • Cú Chulainn’s ríastrad and Related Contortions
    • R.B. Warner:
    • Ptolemy’s Isamnion Promontory: Rehabilitation and Identification
    • John Ó Neill:
    • Lieutenant-General Alexander Campbell’s Loughnashade Horn
    • R.B. Warner:
    • A Lost, Iberian-style, Bronze Age Gold Neck-ring from near Navan, Co. Armagh
    • C. O. Hunt:
    • Fire, Rush Lights and Pine at Navan?
    • Victoria Ginn:
    • Power to the People: Reinterpreting Bronze Age Society
    • M. Baillie and D. Brown:
    • A Chronological Framework for the Period from 208 BC to AD 600
    • Lisa Coyle McClung:
    • The Late Iron Age Lull – not so Late Iron Age after all!
  • A wide range of authors describe, analyse, interpret and re-interpret parts of the complex understudied, and at times misunderstood, archive of eight thousand years of Co. Sligo’s past. Drawing on new and exciting knowledge about what Sligo looked like at times in the remote past, the events which changed lifestyles and the products of humble and status craftsmen the authors give us a greater understanding of our county and its place in Ireland’s past and present and they inform us of some inspired intellectual and artistic giants of more recent centuries. The illustrations draw us out into the Sligo landscape, so richly endowed with the natural beauty, archaeology and history that surrounds us all the days of our lives.
  • This collection of 34 essays celebrates fifty years of the Sligo Field Club and reflect the interests of its members in the archaeology and environment of County Sligo, Ireland. A wide variety of subjects are included supported by photographs, illustrations and maps. With contributions from the likes of Stefan Bergh, Mary B. Timoney, Peter Harbison, Catherine Swift, Nollaig Ó Muraíle, Kieran O'Conor, Etienne Rynne and many more, it provides a fascinating insight into Co. Sligo's past and heritage.
  • Full Descriptions of Eighty Memorials from all over Co. Sligo with comparative entries for over 500 memorials which commemorate past loved ones, some, the short and only annals of many a departed soul, others monuments of national importance, together with notices, details and location of the graveyards. The styles of artwork, the first written description of the Masons of Sligo, who so lovingly carved these monuments, notices of the families commemorated, their lives and properties illustrated by 230 photographs, selected from an archive of 7,000 photographs, rubbings, drawings and a map. Provided to assist the reader in appreciating those memorials and the many other memorials to the dead of Co. Sligo of the last 4 centuries.
  • Sligo Field Club was 70 years old in 2015 and to celebrate the occasion it has published the first volume of what it hopes will be an annual journal. There are 15 articles covering a period of 5,000 years. Topics included:
    • Megalithic tombs of Sligo
    • Early Christian sites and early roads
    • The symbolism of Griffins
    • Folklore on the source of the Moy
    • The Spanish Armada and Sligo business history
    • The Jalandhar Mutiny
    • Barytes mining and aspects of the natural world such as ornithology, butterflies and moths.
  • Contents include:
    • Bunduff Four-poster
    • A Sand Dune or Mound
    • Moytara Stone Axheads
    • A Priest, A Cairn and a Bead
    • A Violent Death in Medieval Sligo
    • The Place Name Bradullen
    • Sligo Salt Industry : 1700-1850
    • Map of Sligo Gas Network in 1861
    • Gulls of Sligo Town
    • Dragonflies and Damselflies of Sligo
    • Yeats International Summer School.
  • Contents include:
    • A Souterrain in a Midden at Culleenamore
    • A Chair for Dubhaltach Mac Fhir Bhisigh
    • The ‘Poets Chairs’ at Skreen
    • Mac Fhirbhisigh Memorial: unveiling
    • Evidence for Surnames in Sligo Placenames
    • Jones Family, Benada Abbey, Co. Sligo
    • German Perceptions of Sligo: 1850s, Col. W.G. Wood-Martin, 1847 - 1917
    • Marine Debris Along the Sligo Coast
    • Death’s-head Hawk-moth in Co. Sligo
    • An Interview with Jack Flynn.
  • The fourth instalment of the Sligo Field Club Journal edited by Martin A. Timoney and Jim Foran.  
  • Contents Waddell, John: Equine cults and Celtic goddesses, 5-18. Hicks, Ronald: The rout of Ailill and Medbh: myth on the landscape, 19-34. Fenwick, Joe: The late prehistoric ‘Royal Site’ of Rathcroghan, Co. Roscommon: an enduring paradigm of enclosed sacred space, 35-51. McCarthy, Mike & Curley, Daniel: Exploring the nature of the Fráoch Saga – An examination of associations with the legendary warrior on Mag nAí, 53-62. Warner, R.B.: Ptolemy’s River Winderis: a corrected identification, a sea-monster and Roman material from the adjacent sandhills, 63-67 Ó Drisceoil, Cóilín & Walsh, Aidan: New radiocarbon dates for the Black Pig’s Dyke at Aghareagh West and Aghnaskew, County Monaghan, 69-79. Brandherm, Dirk; McSparron, Cormac; Kahlert, Thorsten & Bonsall, James: Topographical and geophysical survey at Knocknashee, Co. Sligo – Results from the 2016 campaign, 81-96. Wilkinson, Anthony: Knocknashee – Local perceptions, 97-98. McCafferty, Patrick: The fear of fairy forts: archaeological preservation by plague and superstition, 99-106.
  • This 2nd edition of the book explores the history and times past of the parish of Taughmaconnell in South Roscommon and comes eighteen years on from the first iteration. The aim of the book is to provide a window into a way of life, much of which is no longer to be seen. It is the story of struggle, comradeship and an appreciation of community.
  • Richly illustrated, this book is a valuable resource not just for the people of Roscommon, but a template for memorial studies in other counties. This research began in 2012 with the study of the grave memorials of the late 17th century to the 1860's in Ballintober Old, Co. Roscommon. The richness of memorial work here is indication of the importance of Ballintober and the O'Conor family. A catalogue of these memorials, including the full inscription, photo and references is given. Details: 528 A4 pages, 1,331 colour images, hardback only. Mary B. Timoney, originally from Waterford and living in south Sligo, has been researching graveyard memorials since 1984. She received an M. A. from UCC in 2001 for her study of 'The Decorated Box Tombs of the Skreen School, Co. Sligo, c. 1780 - 1850'. In 2005 she published 'Had Me Made, A Study of the Grave Memorials of Co. Sligo fro c. 1650 to the Present'. She has lectured and published on grave memorials in Co.s Cavan, Monaghan, Roscommon and Sligo as well as on the Association for the Preservation of the Memorials of the Dead, Ireland, and on the care of graveyards.
  • Examines one of the most important frontier regions of Europe in the thirteenth century by defining the relationship between Gaelic lords, Anglo-Norman lords, and the medieval environmental landscape of the King’s Cantreds, a space that was both the homeland of O’Conor royal authority from the eighth century and a defined holding of the English kings in the early thirteenth century. This work offers a new and innovative insight into the history of thirteenth-century Ireland by exploring the interplay between Gaelic lords, Anglo-Norman lords, and the medieval environmental landscape that connected them. Focusing on the king’s cantreds of Roscommon, a space that was both the homeland of the O’Conor royal authority from the eighth century and a defined holding of the English kings from the early thirteenth century. The book explores the frontier landscape as an active player in its own right within Irish history and discusses the way that both Gaels and Anglo-Normans interacted with, and were in turn influenced by, this environment. This unique approach to Irish history enables the author to step away from the traditional view of a dyadic relationship between Gaelic and Anglo-Norman lords and instead demonstrate that not only did both sides alter and change the environment around them according to their perceptions of their enemies and the threat posed by the land, but that the landscape itself was to play a significant role in shaping and influencing the identities and destiny of its inhabitants.
  • Emania is the premier interdisciplinary journal publishing original research on Ireland's Celtic past. The main focus of the journal is on the Ulster Cycle of tales, the ancient 'Royal Sites' of Ireland and the archaeology and environment of Ireland in the period from the Late Bronze Age until the Early Medieval period. The contents of issue 22 is as follows:
    • Editorial
    • Ranke de Vries: The Ulster Cycle in the Netherlands
    • J.P. Mallory and Gina Baban:  Excavations in Haughey’s Fort East
    • Meriel McClatchie: Food Production in the Bronze Age: Analysis of Plant Macro-remains from Haughey’s Fort, Co. Armagh
    • Gina Baban: Late Bronze Age Pottery from the Excavations at Haughey’s Fort East
    • Dirk Brandherm: Late Bronze Age casting debris and other base metal finds from Haughey’s Fort
    • R.B. Warner: The Gold Fragments from Haughey’s Fort, Co. Armagh: Description and XRF Analysis
    • Rena Maguire: The Y-piece: Function, Production, Typology and Possible Origins
    • Billy Ó Foghlú: Irish Iron Age Horns, and the Conical Spearbutt of Navan: A Mouthpiece Investigation
    • Chris Lynn: Some Pictish Symbols: Leatherworking Diagrams and Razor Holders?
    • Grigory Bondarenko: A ‘Kshatriya Revolution’ in the Ulster Cycle?
    • Paul Gosling: The Route of Táin Bó Cúailnge Revisited
  • Remembering St. Comán - Patron Saint of Ros Comáin by Noel Hoare. This book traces the legacy of St. Comán across the centuries, and in so doing sheds light on generations of Roscommon people. This is a comprehensive historical, archaeological and folklore-based study carried out by amateur historian Noel Hoare, where no stone was left unturned as he sought to bring the story of St. Comán and his importance in Co. Roscommon to light. A must have for anyone interested in Roscommon and it's origins.
  • For the nostalgic among you, this classic album by Horslips is a must for any music collection. Still great after all these years. Track List - Setanta, Maeves Court, Charolais,The March, You Can't Fool The Beast, Dearg Doom, Ferdia's Song, Gae Bolga, Cu Chulainn's Lament, Faster Than The Hound, The Silver Spear, More Than You Can Chew, The Morrigan's Dream, Time To Kill. Jim Lockhart keyboards, flute, whistles, uilleann pipes, vocals. Eamon Carr drums, bodhran, percussion. Barry Devlin bass, vocals. Charles O’Connor fiddle, mandolin, concertina, vocals. Johhny Fean guitar, banjo, vocals.
  • One of three limited, bespoke ogham plaques exclusively produced for Rathcroghan Visitor Centre, featuring a representation of Fráoch, the legendary warrior of Connacht, whose heroic deeds are immortalised on the Rathcroghan landscape. This reference is based on the Ogham inscription at Oweynagat, Rathcroghan, Co. Roscommon.