• This guidebook contains entries on every aspect of Rathcroghan, from its archaeological and historical landscapes, through to its literary and mythological associations. This publication is the quintessential user’s guide to this fascinating archaeological landscape. Drawing upon historical, literary and cutting-edge archaeological research, Rathcroghan: The Guidebook is designed to bring the reader on a journey through time at Rathcroghan, from the first settlers to this broad limestone plain in the Neolithic period, through to the political mechanics of late medieval Machaire Connacht. Thereafter, you will be taken on a journey of a different kind. You will see how our ancestors wove a tapestry of literature on top of this canvas of Rathcroghan, connecting physical landmarks and ancestor burials with the intoxicating narrative of Queen Medb of Connacht and the Ulster Cycle of Tales, filled with war and strife, jealousy and intrigue, gods and mere mortals.
  • Rathcroghan and Carnfree (Celtic Royal Sites in Roscommon), by Prof. Michael Herity. This guide is based on a survey of the antiquities in an area of 100 square kilometres around Cruachain and Carnfree begun before 1980. The results of the survey have been published in four articles in the Journal of the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland (1983, 1984, 1987, 1988).
  • This driving tour has been designed for the visitor to Rathcroghan to be able to experience a selection of the great number of monuments on the landscape here in your own time and at your own pace. This unique environment has been interacted with for over 6,000 years, beginning in the Neolithic, and continuing to be used in different forms up until the late medieval period at least. The monuments here fall into a range of categories, from burial and funerary monuments, to settlement sites and field boundaries. Aside from these, monuments such as Rathcroghan Mound and the cave of Oweynagat give us an insight into the minds of the people who constructed and used these monuments. Viewing this archaeological landscape in association with the huge corpus of medieval Irish literature that refers to Cruachan Aí and, in particular, the cast of characters that we encounter in the epic Táin Bó Cúailnge (Cattle Raid of Cooley) allows us to gain an understanding of the lives and beliefs of the Iron Age and early historic Irish.
  • Rathcroghan (Crúachain) is often referred to as both a 'Celtic' Royal Settlement and a sacred burial place; it is one of several major royal sites in ancient Ireland, such as Tara, Co. Meath, Knockaulin, Co. Kildare, and Navan Fort near Armagh, that are frequently mentioned in early literature. While these sites had special importance in early historic times, and in some cases bore and extraordinary weight of myth and legend, we now know that they are older archaeological assemblages of impressive complexity and size. This book is the result of a major programme of archaeological field research at Rathcroghan in County Roscommon in the West of Ireland. The project involved the use of a range of geophysical techniques to explore a number of extraordinary monuments in the Royal Site.
  • Remembering St. Comán - Patron Saint of Ros Comáin by Noel Hoare. This book traces the legacy of St. Comán across the centuries, and in so doing sheds light on generations of Roscommon people. This is a comprehensive historical, archaeological and folklore-based study carried out by amateur historian Noel Hoare, where no stone was left unturned as he sought to bring the story of St. Comán and his importance in Co. Roscommon to light. A must have for anyone interested in Roscommon and it's origins.
  • The town and castle of Rindoon were founded in 1227 as a royal Anglo-Norman borough and fortress on the sometimes turbulent frontier between the Anglo- Norman colony in Ireland and a region controlled by the Irish O'Conor kings of Connacht. The well preserved remains at Rindoon are regarded as being one of the most important medieval complexes still standing in Britain and Ireland. It is, also, without doubt one of the finest examples in Europe of a deserted medieval town. The deserted town and castle of Rindoon are situated on the peninsula of St. John's Point, which runs out south eastwards from the western, Connacht shore of Lough Ree. It is hoped that this guidebook will provide not only information, but enjoyment for those who visit Rindoon and St. John's Point. Its detailed nature will hopefully also make it a contribution to the ongoing academic research currently being carried out on Ireland's medieval towns, castles, abbeys and priories.
  • "In 'Roscommon Abbey: A Visitor’s Guide' Dr. Kieran O’Conor and Brian Shanahan chart the history and architectural development of Roscommon Abbey from the mid-thirteenth century onwards. The full colour illustrated guidebook has chapters called: Ecclesiastical activity at Roscommon before the Dominicans; Who were the Dominicans? The foundation of the priory in 1253; the subsequent history of the priory; the siting of the priory; the physical remains at Roscommon priory today; a tour of the thirteenth-century priory and a tour of the fifteenth century priory. The guidebook also includes two detailed historical reconstruction drawings by Daniel Tietzsch Tyler and a box text by Colmán Ó Clabaigh OSB outlining a typical day in the life of a Dominican Friar in medieval Ireland." 'Authors: Dr Kieran O’Conor is a lecturer in archaeology in NUI, Galway. Brian Shanahan worked in the Medieval Rural Settlement project with the Discovery Programme.'
  • "In Roscommon Castle a Visitor’s Guide Margaret Murphy and Kieran O’Conor chart the history and architectural development of Roscommon Castle from the mid-thirteenth century onwards. The full colour illustrated guidebook has chapters called: The History of the Castle, The Siting of the Castle, A tour of the Late Thirteeneth-Century Castle, The Late Medieval O’Conor Occupation and A Tour of the Late Sixteenth-Century Castle. The guidebook also includes two detailed historical reconstruction drawings by Daniel Tietzsch Tyler. This guidebook is intended to be a comprehensive guide for visitors to Roscommon castle, as well as a point of reference for academics and local historians. Historic Reconstruction Drawings used in the guidebook intended to give the visitor an impression of what the castle may have been like in the thirteenth and sixteenth centuries." "Authors: Dr Kieran O’Conor is a lecturer in archaeology in NUI, Galway. Margaret Murphy MA graduated from NUIG in 2002, after writing her Masters Dissertation on the subject of Roscommon Castle. She wrote the guidebook based on the findings of her Masters. She works as a freelance archaeologist and lives in Galway."
  • This investigation considers the places on the Irish landscape where open-air Gaelic royal inauguration assemblies were held in the period c. 1100-1600. Specially designated inauguration sites played an important role in the political life of Gaelic lordships in later medieval Ireland. Gaelic ruling families often appropriated prehistoric ritual landscapes for their royal assemblies in order to attach the pedigree of a royal candidate to an illustrious past; such sites might be an alleged burial place of an eponymous ancestor or a legendary heroic figure, or an ancient landscape associated with renowned events. This study of their physical appearance, place-names, and geographical and historical contexts ranges over all the archaeological sites identified as inauguration places - enclosures, sepulchral mounds, natural places, ringforts and churches, and associated inauguration furniture in the form of leaca and stone thrones, basin stones and sacred trees. Irish royal assembly places and practices are viewed in relation to sites elsewhere in Britain and greater Europe, and the circumstances that brought about the ending of the Gaelic practice of inauguration are also considered. Author - Elizabeth Fitzpatrick
  • Covering a large swathe of the eastern part of the county, 'Sliabh Bán, A Historical Journey', is a 470-page volume which chronicles the lives and times of generations past who lived on and around the rugged mountain. This publication is the culmination of twenty years of research and writing by Henry Owens of Lismehy. He has been assisted in recent years by Mike Lennon, now Dublin-based, but who grew up in Corbohill.  
  • Sligo Field Club was 70 years old in 2015 and to celebrate the occasion it has published the first volume of what it hopes will be an annual journal. There are 15 articles covering a period of 5,000 years. Topics included:
    • Megalithic tombs of Sligo
    • Early Christian sites and early roads
    • The symbolism of Griffins
    • Folklore on the source of the Moy
    • The Spanish Armada and Sligo business history
    • The Jalandhar Mutiny
    • Barytes mining and aspects of the natural world such as ornithology, butterflies and moths.
  • The fourth instalment of the Sligo Field Club Journal edited by Martin A. Timoney and Jim Foran.  
  • Contents include:
    • Bunduff Four-poster
    • A Sand Dune or Mound
    • Moytara Stone Axheads
    • A Priest, A Cairn and a Bead
    • A Violent Death in Medieval Sligo
    • The Place Name Bradullen
    • Sligo Salt Industry : 1700-1850
    • Map of Sligo Gas Network in 1861
    • Gulls of Sligo Town
    • Dragonflies and Damselflies of Sligo
    • Yeats International Summer School.
  • Contents include:
    • A Souterrain in a Midden at Culleenamore
    • A Chair for Dubhaltach Mac Fhir Bhisigh
    • The ‘Poets Chairs’ at Skreen
    • Mac Fhirbhisigh Memorial: unveiling
    • Evidence for Surnames in Sligo Placenames
    • Jones Family, Benada Abbey, Co. Sligo
    • German Perceptions of Sligo: 1850s, Col. W.G. Wood-Martin, 1847 - 1917
    • Marine Debris Along the Sligo Coast
    • Death’s-head Hawk-moth in Co. Sligo
    • An Interview with Jack Flynn.
  • This 2nd edition of the book explores the history and times past of the parish of Taughmaconnell in South Roscommon and comes eighteen years on from the first iteration. The aim of the book is to provide a window into a way of life, much of which is no longer to be seen. It is the story of struggle, comradeship and an appreciation of community.
  • Paul Connolly, originally from Mount Talbot, County Roscommon, has a keen interest in history, particularly in the history of his local area and county. Paul is the administrator for the very popular Facebook page that shares its name with this publication. This beautiful bespoke book is a paperback and the width of the spine gives an indication of the thickness of the book, 273 pages jam packed full of photographs and information.
  • 'The Morrigan at the Cave of Oweynagat', t-shirt. A unique, high quality ADULT t-shirt, exclusively produced for Rathcroghan Visitor Centre. (Image by Charlotte Krause)
  • This is an A to Z celebration of Roscommon Writers, with work from Gerry Boland, Patrick Chapman, Jane Clarke, Margret Cousins, Bithia Mary Croker, Charlotte O'Conor Eccles, Percy French, Kieran Furey, Oliver Goldsmith, Hanna Greally, Kevin Hora, Douglas Hyde, Ann Joyce, Brian Leydan, Alice Lyons, Tomás Láidír MacCoisdealbha, John McGahern, Arthur Murphy, Turlough O'Carolan, M.F. Ó'Conchuir, Micheal O'Dea, Brian O'Dougherty, Seán Ó'Neachtain, Thomas Heazle Parke, Grace Rhys, Dermot Somers, Edward Synge, Marie-Louise Legg, David Thomson, Mary Turley-McGrath, John Waters and William Robert Wills Wilde. Foreword by Professor Mary McAleese. Contains a Literary Road Map of County Roscommon.
  • Thomas J. Devine was born on the 16th of November 1862 at Clarkwood, Co. Sligo. ​He was an administrator of public affairs for County Roscommon over a lengthy period. ​​The table of contents include: - James J. O' Kelly - The Irish Party and the United Irish League - Thomas J. Devine's Family Background - Early Political Career - Jasper Tully - Selection of Candidates - The Election Campaign - The Election and How its Result was Received - Life After Politics